We’re delighted to be supporting Lewis, the Nice 2b Nice charity’s lovely Support Dog

 

L to R Kerrie Morley Hayley Bateman Lisa Dibnah and Pippa Kaplowitch with Lewis the Support Dog

We celebrated our sponsorship of Lewis, the Support Dog from Hull charity Nice 2b Nice, by welcoming the eight month old Labrador, and owner David Freer, to our Hedon practice on last week.

Nice 2b Nice supports disadvantaged children under the age of 16 living in the Hull and East-Riding area and will use therapy dog, Lewis to bring comfort to sick children and those with learning disabilities once he has completed his training in March.

We will be sponsoring Lewis’ routine medical care during the year and our fundraising team hopes to raise a significant amount through a series of fundraising activities, including vet Pippa Kaplowitch and nurse Emma Wyndham who will complete the national Three Peaks Challenge for the charity.

Lisa Dibnah, from our accounts department is a member of the charity committee who heard of a local charity that was starting a new venture with a therapy dog.

Lisa said: “I found out about Nice 2b Nice through a friend whose son had attended a ‘surprise day’ at his primary school and it was clear that this charity is making a big impression on people’s lives.

“In the past, we have held numerous fundraising events throughout the year for different charities, but this year, we all agreed that we could make a bigger impact by supporting a single local charity that really makes a difference in the community.

“It’s great to support Nice 2b Nice as it is a charity that is just beginning to take therapy dogs into hospitals, hospices, schools, and other places dogs are not usually allowed, in order to cheer people up.

Lisa concluded: “We hope that it’s a cause that many of our clients will be keen to get involved with too, as animal lovers.”

David Freer established Nice 2b Nice in 2014 after campaigning to raise funds to replace a boy’s stolen wheelchair.

The charity helps to provide financial support, organise surprise days, operates a respite centre and care home and offers a therapy dog service.

David said: “We’re delighted that Haven has chosen to support us and Lewis.

“Dogs like Lewis spread a lot of happiness and provide a mental lift for those who are hospitalised or receiving medical treatment at home,” he added.

“During his training, Lewis has had a great effect on the children we support and, once he’s fully trained, we’d like to help many more children.”

To find out more about supporting Nice 2b Nice or booking a visit from Lewis see www.nice2bnice.org.uk or email nice2bnice72@yahoo.com.

Congratulations, Carol on your 40th anniversary with Haven Veterinary Group

We were delighted to mark a special staff anniversary with a surprise lunch recently.

Carol Burnham, pictured left above, head receptionist of the small animal department at our Hedon practice, celebrated 40 years of service with 15 colleagues as we toasted her anniversary over lunch.

Her husband Richard and retired colleagues also made an appearance for the occasion when she was presented with a watch and a bouquet of flowers by our owner and principal vet, Jim Morris.

Carol, of Burstwick, joined the practice initially working in the large animal side of the business before moving over to the small animal department.

 Jim paid tribute to her commitment to the practice: “We’re very pleased to mark Carol’s 40 years of service here at Haven and we’d all like to wholeheartedly thank her for her loyal service.

“She is one of the first people our patients and owners see when they visit the practice and her willingness to help is exemplary.”

Lisa Dibnah, who works in the finance department, said: “It was lovely to surprise Carol with a special lunch, and reminisce about the funny things that had happened over the years.”

Carol said it was wonderful to mark the milestone with her colleagues and friends.

“I’d like to thank everyone for their support over the years – the practice has really grown from the early days when the large animal department was in a Portakabin.”

Pictured left to right is Carol with colleagues Sandra, Karen and Judy.

Generation Pup

Generation Pup is the first study to follow dogs of all breeds from puppy-hood as they grow up into adults. They are asking owners of all UK puppies of 16 weeks of age or less, of any breed or cross breed, to sign up and become part of the Generation Pup community.  So Haven Veterinary Group have decided to get on board and help to recruit puppy owners.

By collecting information about each puppy – their environment, family, health, behaviour and experiences – we can build up a picture of a whole generation of dogs across the UK. This means that researchers in the Generation Pup team can investigate whether aspects such as environment, social interaction, diet, exercise or daily routine may be important in the development of a range of health and behaviour conditions which impact on the well-being of our dogs.

Autumn Newsletter 2017

Autumn Newsletter 17

Willow the Red Necked Wallaby Joey

Here at Haven Veterinary Group we have some nice news to share –
We would like to introduce you to ‘Willow’ the Red Necked Wallaby joey.

Willow was brought to us in late May after being rejected by her mother. We ascertained that she was approximately 6 months old by looking at her dental development which meant she should actually still be getting all her care and food by way of milk within her mothers pouch for another 4 months or so.

Therefore a surrogate mother was needed. Hayley (our senior nurse) stepped in and has become Willows ‘mum’.  A man-made pouch was constructed, incorporating a heat pad and the process of 4 hourly feeds round the clock commenced. Willow quickly got used to living in her pouch at the end of the bed at Hayley’s house (Mick her husband is very understanding!) and spending her days whilst Hayley was at work hanging in her pouch in Jim’s (our principles office who is also very accommodating!) 

Willow is doing really well and is now approximately 8 1/2 months old and going from strength to strength. She now only requires bottle feeding morning and night and is eating solid food, grasses and greens and has trebled in weight.

As wallabies are mainly nocturnal she now spends her days at Hayleys home snoozing in her pouch during the day and bounding around the house and garden during the evenings.

Willow is very social and has plenty of other family members animal/human for company.

We will keep you updated on Willows progress weekly including photos and videos.

We’re delighted that our equine practice has been upgraded by the RCVS

The team at our equine practice in Hedon are celebrating after being upgraded to the new accreditation level Equine General Practice – Ambulatory by the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS) – the highest accreditation we could receive for the facilities at our Ketwell Lane site.

Equine General Practice – Ambulatory is an accreditation for equine practices that provide a GP level service without stabling facilities or premises where horses are treated. It means the practice meets RCVS Core and GP requirements in all modules except In-Patients.

Our owner and principal vet, Jim Morris, said that receiving news of the standard upgrade is an official acknowledgement of the equine teams’ expertise.

“We work hard to maintain high standards of veterinary care here at the practice and this latest accreditation shows our dedication to our profession,” he added.

To attain the RCVS General Practice grade, veterinary practices must meet a range of minimum standards including hygiene, 24-hour emergency cover, staff training, certain types of equipment and cost estimation procedures.

On the subject of equestrian matters (ish!), our practice manager, Mandy Dobbs will be testing her riding skills when she competes in the annual Camel Derby at Beverley Races on 17th August. Sporting silks in Haven’s colours, Mandy is competing in the race to raise money for Save the Children.

Mandy said: “This will certainly be different to riding horses, but it’s a fantastic cause, and I’m looking forward to what should be a fun event for charity.”

To support Mandy’s camel derby, visit www.justgiving.com/fundraising/amanda-dobbs.

Here’s a great photo of Mandy on her usual mount!

We’re proud to announce that our Hedon equine practice has been upgraded by the RCVS

The team at Haven in Hedon are celebrating after our equine facility has been upgraded to the new accreditation level Equine General Practice – Ambulatory, by the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS).

This is the highest accreditation that we could receive for the facilities at our Ketwell Lane site and we’re highly delighted.

Equine General Practice – Ambulatory is an accreditation for equine practices that provide a GP level service without stabling facilities or premises where horses are treated. It means the practice meets RCVS Core and GP requirements in all modules except In-Patients.

Our owner and principal vet, Jim Morris, said that receiving news of the standard upgrade is an official acknowledgement of the equine teams’ expertise.

“We work hard to maintain high standards of veterinary care here at the practice and this latest accreditation shows our dedication to our profession,” he added.

To attain the RCVS General Practice grade, we needed to meet a range of minimum standards including hygiene, 24-hour emergency cover, staff training, certain types of equipment and cost estimation procedures.

Meanwhile, our practice manager, Mandy Dobbs will be testing her equestrian skills when she competes in the annual Camel Derby at Beverley Races on 17th August. Sporting silks in Haven’s colours, Mandy is competing in the race to raise money for Save the Children.

Mandy said: “This will certainly be different to riding horses, but it’s a fantastic cause, and I’m looking forward to what should be a fun event for charity.”

To support Mandy’s camel derby, visit www.justgiving.com/fundraising/amanda-dobbs.

Dog ID Tags and The Law

Please remember, although every dog must be microchipped by law in the UK, it is also the law that any dog in a public place must wear a collar with the name and address (inc. postcode) of the owner engraved on it.

You can be fined up to £5,000 if your dog does not wear an identification tag.

You do not have to put your dogs’ name on the tag, this is optional. Unfortunately dog theft is a real danger and if the thief knows the name of your dog this may help them pass on the dog to the unsuspecting new owners because it appears they know the dog as it responds to their name.

 

We would therefore recommend that you do not put your dogs’ name on the tag.

Examples:

Mr A Smith
54 Letsbe Avenue
BH17 7TD
01202 232218

Mr A Smith
No.54, BH17 7TD
01202 232218

 

Some people are of the opinion that if their dog is microchipped, they do not require a dog tag with their contact details on it. This is incorrect, and you should always have a dog tag on your dogs’ collar.

1992 Law Exemptions

The Control of Dogs Order does state seven exemptions to the law:
• any pack of hounds (hunting animals)
• any dog while being used for sporting purposes
• any dog while being used for the capture or destruction of vermin
• any dog while being used for the driving or tending of cattle or sheep
• any dog while being used on official duties by a member of Her Majesty’s Armed Forces or Her Majesty’s Customs and Excise or the police force for any area
• any dog while being used in emergency rescue work
• any dog registered with the Guide Dogs for the Blind Association

Enforcement
The enforcement of the law is not carried out by the police force in any area but by ‘the officers of a local authority’.

The vast majority of pet owners will not qualify for exemption, and if you are unsure if you do qualify for exemption it is highly recommended that you always display ID tags on all of your dogs in a public area to be on the safe side.

As the law is enforced by local authorities, you should seek further information from your local council.

Free Firework Clinic

REMEMBER, REMEMBER THE 5TH NOVEMBER

Unfortunately, fireworks can go off anytime near Bonfire night and beyond.

Is your dog a quivering nervous wreck, who is petrified from the noise fireworks make?

We offer a free clinic, which shows you how to desensitize your dog against the noises of fireworks and receive a free CD.

But now is the time to act, as the sooner you start the better outcome for your dog.

 

Please ring to book an appointment,

or ask at reception.

Holly Wallaby

Holly came to us 3 weeks ago as her mother was unwell and had rejected her and pushed her out of the pouch.

Wallaby joeys are very tiny when born, smaller than a jelly bean and grow inside their mothers pouch. They do not develop any fur until they are about 5 months old so are kept constantly in the pouch until then. The pouch is the equivalent of an incubator. Joeys spend most of their time in the pouch for growth and safety, gradually emerging for longer periods of time until they are ready to be independent at about a year old. They do still squeeze into the pouch after weaning if they feel threatened or scared as this is their place of safety.

Consequently this meant that this baby joey needed a surrogate mum to bottle feed her for the next 6 months or so ! A member of our team took  on the role of ‘mum’ and fed Holly bottles 5 times a day starting at 6.30AM!!

Holly slowly started gaining weight and to nibble on grasses and tree bark as she would in the wild.

She started to follow her ‘mum’ around the garden making a cute chirrup type sound when her ‘mum’ went out of view. When all fed and her tummy was full she retired to her man-made heated pouch and sucked her little toe just like a dummy.

Holly was doing really well when out of the blue she started to become unwell, she started taking less of her bottle and became lethargic. Unfortunately Holly then started with gastrointestinal problems and despite medical and supportive treatment she continued to deteriorate.

Sadly within 24 hours of the sudden onset of her symptoms we had to make the difficult decision to let Holly go as this was the kindest thing to do for her.

Holly was only with us for a short time but made a huge impression and is sadly missed by us all.